Ohana now means community

This semester I have been so focused on getting acclimated into life at UNCC that I have not actually taken any time to join any clubs or alternate communities. Discourse communities are defined as a group of communicators with a common goal or interest that adopts certain preferred ways of participating in public discussion. Thank Dictionary.com for the definition! Usually being in these discourse communities require a specific level of  knowledge or experience.

In high school I was a member of the International Thespian Society which was for those who had a lot of expertise in the drama area of study. I had taken drama for 2 years and done a number of shows so I was quite educated in this field. In the drama “world” there are implied rules such as never say the name MacBeth in an auditorium but there were always formal rules like do not chew gum while on stage. The goals of the ITS have remained the same throughout the years: to give honor students a place to perform and show their excellence. There were several forms of communication which ranged from group chats to newsletter which informed you of the shows that were coming up. We also had to pay a fee in order to become a member to ensure that funds were not being depleted and we had enough to purchase costumes for performances. Our expectations were to show up to class or performances and give it your all, nothing should be “half-assed”. The theater community also has it’s own lingo that comes with the territory; many people who have not taken a theater class do not know what I am referring to. There are times where you will hear someone say use improve in a show because you have forgotten lines or stuff of that sort. In both of my drama classes, there were people who had never done a play but there were also veterans who had done outside work too. There remained a healthy balance between rookies and pros.

Another discourse community that I am currently apart of is the Liberal Arts and Sciences learning community. Whenever I signed up for my Fall semester classes I chose to be in a learning community and also live with people who were members of it too. People do not realize how much less stressful it is to be amongst people who are all taking the same classes as you thus makes you accessible to more resources. That is the primary goal of the leaning community and it also places us automatically in classes that we must take in order to get fully into our majors. Communication is usually face to face or through email if you are not available to meet with that person. The teachers that are chosen for these learning communities usually give feedback through the means of Moodle and provide upcoming dates that are posted around Lynch hall as well. The genres that are present in this community are strictly Liberal Arts/Studies and sciences. Many of the people in my community major in sciences such as chemistry, pre-kinesiology, or bio. We all seem to speak the same lingo when it comes to classes or events that we are mandated for us such as our 8:00 am LBST 2101 class.